India – Jaisalmer and the Thar Desert





We then stop in two small villages, where children and their parents unfortunately try to sell us clothing or crafts and incessantly ask for a pen, money or anything else. Irene succumbs and has a girl paint henna on her hand in exchange of a few ruppees. They proudly show us their mud-walled homes, very simply made and with little belongings, and place some popcorn in our dusty hands. We courteously accept and ask questions, play with the children and answer to what they all ask: What is your name??! (Usually followed by: Do you have a pen? Give me 10 ruppees!). They even look in our pockets that we have previously emptied on purpose.

Dromedaries drinking water from the trough before we arrive and use the water from the deposit to lower some degrees from our burning bodies. The place is really hot.

Dromedaries drinking water from the trough before we arrive and use the water from the deposit to lower some degrees from our burning bodies. The place is really hot.

The people of the first village weave quilts and let them dry on these rocks.

The people of the first village weave quilts and let them dry on these rocks.

A mud house.

A mud house.

Kids all ask questions and are curious about us.

Kids all ask questions and are curious about us.

Irene and the henna artist. She won´t be able to use her hand for long until it dries.

Irene and the henna artist. She won´t be able to use her hand for long until it dries.

At the Muslim village, the majority of the old houses are made of mud, although the ultra sellers of crafts and jewelries that will try to sell us everything like a hurricane have a better brick house for obvious reasons.

At the Muslim village, the majority of the old houses are made of mud, although the ultra sellers of crafts and jewelries that will try to sell us everything like a hurricane have a better brick house for obvious reasons.

A lonely house at the side of the road.

A lonely house at the side of the road.

This is how the roads of the place look like.

This is how the roads of the place look like.

Women travel really long distances to bring water home from the wells. It is really a problem here as you can imagine.

Women travel really long distances to bring water home from the wells. It is really a problem here as you can imagine.

The Thar desert is no Sahara, but there is a small area of sand dunes, and that is where travellers set camp for the night. Camera in hand, we leave our guides taking a nap and go explore the dunes. Not far, another big group of people are arriving on their camels (dromedaires more specifically =P) so we go as far as possible to have them out of our sunset pics. It seems we’ve taken too long there because our host is calling us from camp for dinner. As we are about to sit down, a small sandstorm starts, moving a lot of sand into our food and turning dinner in a crunchy delicacy… Not a experience we would repeat.

The sand is full of seashells dating back to the times where the desert was a sea.

The sand is full of seashells dating back to the times where the desert was a sea.

Small dunes make the characteristic shape of desert sand.

Small dunes make the characteristic shape of desert sand.

The sun is almost setting, creating nice sun rays behind the clouds.

The sun is almost setting, creating nice sun rays behind the clouds.

Just being silly.

Just being silly.

I used the tripod to take some sunset pictures. I will regret it so much some days after in Japan, while cleaning every single piece of the tripod from the sand that got literally EVERYWHERE.

I used the tripod to take some sunset pictures. I will regret it so much some days after in Japan, while cleaning every single piece of the tripod from the sand that got literally EVERYWHERE.

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Huge beetles start surrounding us; they come from everywhere, attracted by our flashlights, body heat and food. They bite slightly and leave cute paths of footprints on the sand.
Bellies quite full, we take a matress, blanket and sleeping bag each and choose a good spot, when a doggie approaches, in the middle of nowhere. It drinks desperately the offered water. Is is hard for dogs here and they learned to survive in such extreme conditions, from village to village, tourist camp to tourist camp.
A hole under our pillows helps keep our belongings safe. Turns out the dogs could grab anything taking it away in search of food. We wait to watch the stars, but unfortunately there isn’t much visibility tonight :(.
Sleeping in the desert can be a romantic experience; only if it wasn’t for the biting beetles, stealing dogs and wind slapping sand to your face. Oh, and tripods with sand grains everywhere that require complete dissasembling and a 2-hour cleaning… (Don’t try this, kids!).

3 thoughts on “India – Jaisalmer and the Thar Desert

  1. La Sandalia !!! … jejejeje …. tranquilos….. aquí también te encuentras un zapato o bamba tirada en medio de la carretera…
    Un reportaje muy bonito… felicidades

  2. Gracias, chicas, nos alegramos de que hayáis compartido nuestro viaje por el desierto… ¡aunque sin tanto calor! 🙂

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